Volume 5, Issue 4, December 2020, Page: 127-130
Purulent Meningitis in Children: A Retrospective Study of 70 Cases in Senegal
Idrissa Basse, Diamniadio Children's Hospital Dakar, University of Thiès, Thies, Senegal
Papa Moctar Faye, Albert Royer National Children's Hospital, Dakar, Senegal
Amadou Sow, Abass Ndao Hospital Center, Dakar, Senegal
Marie Acakpo, Diamniadio Children's Hospital Dakar, University of Thiès, Thies, Senegal
Ndiogou Seck, Regional Hospital of Saint Louis, University of Saint Louis, Saint Louis, Senegal
Lamine Thiam, Regional Hospital of Ziguinchor, University of Ziguinchor, Ziguinchor, Senegal
Ndieme Ndiaye, Diamniadio Children's Hospital Dakar, University of Thiès, Thies, Senegal
Dina Obambi, Diamniadio Children's Hospital Dakar, University of Thiès, Thies, Senegal
Djibril Boiro, Abass Ndao Hospital Center, Dakar, Senegal
Aliou Abdoulaye Ndongo, Aristide Le Dantec Hospital Dakar, Cheikh Anta Diop University of Dakar, Dakar, Senegal
Ndeye Ramatoulaye Diagne Gueye, Diamniadio Children's Hospital Dakar, University of Thiès, Thies, Senegal
Ousmane Ndiaye, Albert Royer National Children's Hospital, Dakar, Senegal
Received: Oct. 15, 2020;       Accepted: Oct. 27, 2020;       Published: Nov. 4, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijidt.20200504.14      View  70      Downloads  39
Abstract
Introduction: Despite much progress, purulent childhood meningitis (PCM) remains a public health problem. The objective of this work was to determine the epidemiological, clinical, therapeutic and evolutionary profile of purulent meningitis in children. Methods: Based on retrospective work carried out over a 4-year period (01 January 2014 to 31 December 2017), we studied the epidemiological, clinical, therapeutic and evolutionary aspects of cases of purulent meningitis hospitalized in the pediatric ward of the Children's Hospital of Diamniadio. Included were all children from 29 days to 15 years of age in whom the diagnosis of purulent meningitis was confirmed by the laboratory. Results: The hospital frequency was 1.9%. The mean age of the patients was 41.0 months. Among the affected children, 68.6% were fully vaccinated. The main germ was Neisseria meningitidis W135 (58.8%). Third generation cephalosporins were the antibiotics of choice (97.1%). No resistance was found to them. The cure rate with sequelae was 5.7%. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the germ responsible for 50% of the objective sequelae. The mortality rate was 7.1%. Conclusion: Neisseria meningitidis W135 is the main germ of purulent meningitis in our study. It is not included in the national routine immunization. It is imperative to adapt vaccination to the epidemiological fluctuation of pathogens in our regions.
Keywords
Meningitis, Purulent, Child, Germs, Senegal
To cite this article
Idrissa Basse, Papa Moctar Faye, Amadou Sow, Marie Acakpo, Ndiogou Seck, Lamine Thiam, Ndieme Ndiaye, Dina Obambi, Djibril Boiro, Aliou Abdoulaye Ndongo, Ndeye Ramatoulaye Diagne Gueye, Ousmane Ndiaye, Purulent Meningitis in Children: A Retrospective Study of 70 Cases in Senegal, International Journal of Infectious Diseases and Therapy. Vol. 5, No. 4, 2020, pp. 127-130. doi: 10.11648/j.ijidt.20200504.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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