Volume 5, Issue 1, March 2020, Page: 4-8
Evolutionary Profile of Cellulitis and Erysipelas of Lower Limbs in a Level-Two Healthcare Facility in Brazzaville, Congo
Edith Sophie Bayonne-Kombo, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Marien Ngouabi University, Brazzaville, Congo; Department of Dermatology and Infectious Diseases, Talangaï Reference Hospital, Brazzaville, Congo
Axel Gillius Aloumba, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Marien Ngouabi University, Brazzaville, Congo; Department of Infectious Diseases, Teaching Hospital, Brazzaville, Congo
Aude Kanga Okandzé, Department of Dermatology and Infectious Diseases, Talangaï Reference Hospital, Brazzaville, Congo
Yanichka Voumbo-Mavoungou, Department of Dermatology and Infectious Diseases, Talangaï Reference Hospital, Brazzaville, Congo
Alphonse Gathsé, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Marien Ngouabi University, Brazzaville, Congo
Received: Jan. 24, 2020;       Accepted: Feb. 12, 2020;       Published: Feb. 19, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijidt.20200501.12      View  238      Downloads  36
Abstract
Background: Cellulitis/erysipelas are the most frequent reason for hospitalization in dermatology departments. Objective: To describe evolutionary profile of cellulitis/erysipelas and to determine associated factors with the long hospital stay. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study carried out from January 2016 to December 2018 in Talangaï Reference Hospital, that included patients hospitalized for cellulitis or erysipelas of the lower limbs. Necrotizing fasciitis cases were excluded. A hospital stay of more than 11 days was considered long. Sociodemographic, clinical and biological data were collected and processed with Epi Info 7.2.1.0. The Chi-square and Fisher tests were used for univariate analysis. Logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis. Results: One hundred and five patients were included, with an average age of 50.7 (±15) years. They were 26 (24.8%) men and 79 (74.2%) women. Antibiotic regimen used was amoxicillin in 19 (18.1%) cases, amoxicillin / clavulanic acid in 40 (38.1%) cases and ceftriaxone in 46 (43.8%) cases. The outcome was favorable in 69 (65.7%) patients. Fever persisted after 5 days-treatment in 19 (28.3%) patients out of 67 initially. Complications were cutaneous necrosis in 19 (18.0%) cases, abscess in 14 (13.3%) cases, severe sepsis and necrotizing fasciitis in 7 and 4 cases, respectively. Two patients died. The average length of hospital stay was 13 days (±7.5) and 44 (41.9%) cases had a long hospital stay. The bullous forms of cellulitis/erysipelas [aOR=4.8, 95%CI (1.9-12.4); p=0.001] and the occurrence of complications [aOR=3.2, 95%CI (1.1-8.7); p=0.026] were associated with a long hospital stay. Conclusion: Cellulitis and erysipelas are potentially serious. Despite treatment, complications can occur, including necrosis and abscess. Effective management, including early medical treatment, daily thorough monitoring of patients, appropriate local care and collaboration with surgeons, is necessary to improve the prognosis of the disease.
Keywords
Cellulitis, Erysipelas, Complication, Abscess, Hospitalization, Congo
To cite this article
Edith Sophie Bayonne-Kombo, Axel Gillius Aloumba, Aude Kanga Okandzé, Yanichka Voumbo-Mavoungou, Alphonse Gathsé, Evolutionary Profile of Cellulitis and Erysipelas of Lower Limbs in a Level-Two Healthcare Facility in Brazzaville, Congo, International Journal of Infectious Diseases and Therapy. Vol. 5, No. 1, 2020, pp. 4-8. doi: 10.11648/j.ijidt.20200501.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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