Volume 4, Issue 3, September 2019, Page: 44-49
Measles in Bamako: Epidemiological, Clinical and Therapeutic Features of Patients Hospitalized at University Teaching Hospital of Point "G"
Mikaila Kabore, Department of Infectious Diseases, Point “G” University Teaching Hospital, Bamako, Mali
Issa Konate, Department of Infectious Diseases, Point “G” University Teaching Hospital, Bamako, Mali; Faculty of Medicine and Odontostomatology, University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali
Yacouba Cissoko, Department of Infectious Diseases, Point “G” University Teaching Hospital, Bamako, Mali; Faculty of Medicine and Odontostomatology, University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali
Bassirou Diarra, Faculty of Medicine and Odontostomatology, University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali; Serefo Program, University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali
Jean Paul Dembele, Department of Infectious Diseases, Point “G” University Teaching Hospital, Bamako, Mali; Faculty of Medicine and Odontostomatology, University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali
Mariam Soumare, Department of Infectious Diseases, Point “G” University Teaching Hospital, Bamako, Mali
Assetou Fofana, Department of Infectious Diseases, Point “G” University Teaching Hospital, Bamako, Mali
Abdoulaye Zare, Department of Infectious Diseases, Point “G” University Teaching Hospital, Bamako, Mali
Hermine Meli, Department of Infectious Diseases, Point “G” University Teaching Hospital, Bamako, Mali
Mohamed Aly Cisse, Department of Infectious Diseases, Point “G” University Teaching Hospital, Bamako, Mali
Dramane Sogoba, Department of Infectious Diseases, Point “G” University Teaching Hospital, Bamako, Mali
Oumar Magassouba, Department of Infectious Diseases, Point “G” University Teaching Hospital, Bamako, Mali
Madou Traore, Department of Medicine, Sikasso Regional Hospital, Sikasso, Mali
Kongnimissom Apoline Sondo, Department of Infectious Diseases, Yalgado Ouedraogo University Teaching Hospital, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Sounkalo Dao, Department of Infectious Diseases, Point “G” University Teaching Hospital, Bamako, Mali; Faculty of Medicine and Odontostomatology, University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali; Serefo Program, University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako (USTTB), Bamako, Mali
Received: Aug. 15, 2019;       Accepted: Sep. 5, 2019;       Published: Sep. 19, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijidt.20190403.13      View  114      Downloads  25
Abstract
Measles is a highly contagious acute febrile eruptive disease. It can be prevented through vaccination. The aim of this study was to determine the epidemiological, clinical, and therapeutic features of measles cases hospitalized at Point "G" University Teaching Hospital. It was a retrospective study to review the medical files of patients hospitalized for measles between January 2010 and May 2011 at the Infectious Diseases Department of the Point "G" University Teaching Hospital. During the study period, 31 patients (6.4%) were treated for measles, and the majority of cases were seen in April months (20 cases) and May months (5 cases). The most affected age group was 9 - 59 months (58.1%) with a sex ratio of 1.38. The majority of patients (64.5%) consulted at least two health facilities before their hospitalization in Point “G” with an average of 5.3 ± 3.6 days from unset to the hospitalization. Measles immunization was not effective in 16 out of 26 patients and nearly one-third (29.0%) had familial contact measles case. Febrile rash, present in all patients, was associated with cough (96.8%), rhinitis (77.4%) and/or conjunctivitis (77.4%). Pneumonia was the most common complication (83.9%) followed by comorbidities such as gastroenteritis (29%), malnutrition (9.7%) and oral candidiasis (9.7%). Amoxicillin and ceftriaxone were the antibiotics frequently used against complications. Patients were hospitalized for an average of 6.9 ± 4.2 days, and no death was recorded. This study revealed that pneumonia was the main complication leading to hospitalization of patients. For a better control of measles, we need to fully respect the immunization schedule which is a guarantee for vaccine efficacy.
Keywords
Bamako, Clinical, Epidemiology, Therapeutic, Complications, Measles
To cite this article
Mikaila Kabore, Issa Konate, Yacouba Cissoko, Bassirou Diarra, Jean Paul Dembele, Mariam Soumare, Assetou Fofana, Abdoulaye Zare, Hermine Meli, Mohamed Aly Cisse, Dramane Sogoba, Oumar Magassouba, Madou Traore, Kongnimissom Apoline Sondo, Sounkalo Dao, Measles in Bamako: Epidemiological, Clinical and Therapeutic Features of Patients Hospitalized at University Teaching Hospital of Point "G", International Journal of Infectious Diseases and Therapy. Vol. 4, No. 3, 2019, pp. 44-49. doi: 10.11648/j.ijidt.20190403.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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